Feminist Narratives

STANFORD FEMINIST NARRATIVES ZINE

Winter 2018

Read Here!

We’re super excited about the first Stanford Feminist Narratives Zine! We wanted to create an archive of writing and art that encompasses some of the variegated feminist narratives that exist in this time, in this space. We hope the love, creativity, and community that are in the pages of this zine can bring you as much joy and resilience as they’ve brought us.

FemZine Cover

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Feminist Voices Podcast: SEASON 2

Episode 1

Listen HERE

Welcome back to to Feminist Voices! We’re kicking off season two with an interview with three hip hop feminists – Dr. Kaila Story, Dr. Treva Lindsey, and Dr. Brittney Cooper.

Dr. Kaila Story is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Women’s and Gender Studies and Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville. She holds the Audre Lorde Chair in Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. She also co-hosts a weekly radio show called “Strange Fruit: Musings on Politics, Pop Culture, and Black Gay Life” on WFPL.

Dr. Treva Lindsey is an Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The Ohio State University. Her first book is Colored No More: Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington D.C. She has published in numerous academic journals and contributed to forums as Al Jazeera, BET and Cosmopolitan.

Dr. Brittney Cooper is Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and Africana Studies at Rutgers University. She is co-founder of the popular Crunk Feminist Collective blog, and her forthcoming book is entitled Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower. Her cultural commentary has been widely featured in forums as NPR, PBS, and TED.com.

Music:
Holy (Reprise) – Jamila Woods
Blk Girl Soldier – Jamila Woods

Bios from the Stanford Institute for Diversity in the Arts

 Episode 2

Listen HERE

Join us for an interview with improviser and educator extraordinaire, Lisa Rowland! We chat about representation in entertainment, if the arts can contribute to justice work, storytelling, teaching, and not taking yourself too seriously.

Music:
Holy (Reprise) – Jamila Woods
Link in Bio – Diet Cig

Feminist Voices Podcast: SEASON 1

Episode 1

Listen Here: https://soundcloud.com/fem-voices/feminist-voices-episode-1

Our inaugural interview with artist A-lan Holt focusing on the importance of healing practices and creation during these troubling times.

Her biography, from the Institute for Diversity in the Arts website:

A-lan Holt is a dramatist and mother, who imagines and manifests entire worlds on stage for close intimate audiences. The landscapes of her written work root themselves in themes of loneliness, love, and utopian desires. A-lan is the youngest writer to be awarded a two-year residency at the Joseph Papp Public Theater in New York City. Her plays and performances have been presented around the US and internationally in Kampala, Uganda (National Theatre of Uganda). Plays include The Bottom (developed starring Lupita N’yongo) and 8ball (Dr. Floyd Gaffney National Playwriting Award, George Fredrickson Prize at Stanford). In 2015, A-lan readies her first collection of poetry: Essences, published by The Perch Chicago, and her first short film: Inamorata, produced by True MVMNT film house. A-lan is a 2011 Stanford Graduate (IDA/CSRE). Please find her online at a-lan.me.

Music:
Feminine Energy – Willow Smith
Soundtrack to a Crackhouse – Tyler Brooks
Green & Gold – Lianne La Havas

 

Episode 2

Listen HERE

Our second episode of Feminist Voices, featuring Bay Area artist and poet Evelyn Anderson.

Artwork:
Evelyn Anderson

Music:
Feminine Energy – Willow Smith
6 8 – Gabriel Garzón-Montano
Unspoken Words – The Soil

Episode 3

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Here is our third episode of Feminist Voices, featuring the “Three Unicorns,” Michelle McGhee, Lindsey Redd, and Alona King. All three women are computer engineers exploring careers in tech and have their own podcast called “Three Unicorns” where they speak in-depth about the struggles and successes of being a woman in computer science. In this episode we combine the two podcasts and speak to them about their experience.

Before listening, we encourage you to listen to their newest episode first, for context: Three-unicorns – Ep-4-you-know-what-would-change-my-worldspecial-code2040-episode. Enjoy!

Music:
Feminine Energy – Willow Smith
Doo Wop (That Thing) – Lauryn Hill

Image:
Official Three Unicorns Logo

Episode 4

Listen HERE

This is our fourth episode of Feminist Voices featuring educator, scholar, and coach Dr. Jeanine Staples. She shares her thoughts on toxic lover identities and the way we express our fractured selves in relationships.

Jeanine likes to mediate way before dawn, work out like a soldier, and shop alone. She prefers rum to wine, jeans to skirts, and likes her heels sky high (except when she’s wearing cowboy boots). Every year she asks her stylist to cornrow and bead her hair in homage to Patrice Rushen and Stevie Wonder (if you know of these artists and understand why demonstrating embodied respect for them is important, you two can probably be friends). She believes in ghosts, fairies, and hobbits (for real). Musically, she vibes to old school everything (hip hop, R&B, jazz, rock, and classical) and especially digs Hildegard von Bingen. She trusts children a little bit more than adults, respects teens for their fearlessness, admires elders for their tenacity, and occasionally prefers the company of dogs to people. Jeanine’s really getting into interior design and has a penchant for acquiring east coast real estate. She is also a survivor of multiple terrors in love.

Episode 5

Listen HERE

For our final episode, we interviewed world renowned dancer and instructor, Amara Tabor-Smith.

Amara Tabor-Smith, artistic director of Deep Waters Dance Theater (DWDT), received her MFA in dance from Hollins University and The Frankfurt University of Music and Performing Arts in Germany. She has performed in the works of theater and dance artists such as Anna Deveare Smith, Ronald K. Brown, Faustin Linyekula, Marc Bamuthi Joseph, Paloma McGregor, Herbert Siquenza, Joanna Haigood, and she is the former associate artistic director and dancer with the Urban Bush Women Dance Company (1996- 2005). She has created work in collaboration with many dance and theater artists such as: Ellen Sebastian Chang, Jose Navarrete, Christal Brown, Byb Chanel Biben and was the co artistic director of Headmistress (2009-2013); an ongoing collaboration with dancer Sherwood Chen. Amara describes her choreographic work as Afro Futurist Conjure art. Her dance making practice utilizes Yoruba spiritual ritual to address issues of social and environmental justice, community, identity and belonging. Her work with DWDT and Headmistress has been presented at Judson Church, CounterPULSE Theater, Rue Danse Festival in Brazzaville, Congo; Dancer’s Group/ONSITE, ODC Theater, Dance Mission Theater and other venues both nationally and internationally. She has had the great pleasure of teaching at institutions such as SF State University, Naropa University, University of Colorado, Boulder, and Columbia College in Chicago. Residency awards include, The Headlands Center for the Arts artist in residence, CHIME Mentorship Exchange grant, CounterPULSE artist in residence, Espaço Xisto artist in residence in Salvador, Bahia; Green Choreographers exchange at Dance Exchange in Tacoma Park,MD, and she recently completed a residency at ODC Theater in SF (2013-2015). Amara has received grants from The Zellerbach Family Foundation, East Bay Community Foundation, The Creative Work Fund, The Kenneth Rainin Foundation, The Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation, Theatre Bay Area/CA$H and she is a 2016 recipient of the Creative Capital Grant.

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